Fireworks Safety: Light Up the Night and Stay Safe!

By | Health Basics, Lifestyle | No Comments

Fireworks Danger Austin

The 4th of July wouldn’t be the same without backyard barbecues, parades, and of course, fireworks! While firework displays are a great way to celebrate, make sure you and everyone in your family know about firework safety. Even the smallest fireworks (yes, sparklers included!) can send someone to the ER.

Unfortunately, there are no such things as “safe” fireworks. If not handled properly, fireworks can cause burn and eye injuries in both kids and adults. Over 30 percent of the 5,200 injuries from fireworks each year happen to children—most of which are from sparklers, novelty devices, and aerial devices. These injuries include burns, lacerations, and even partial finger amputations. The best way to protect your family is not to use any fireworks at home. Instead, attend a local public firework displays and leave the lighting to the professionals.

If you do choose to use fireworks at home, here are a few safety guidelines from the National Fire Protection Association to follow:

  1. Always check local laws and regulations. Anything that’s banned is also unregulated, which means it could be dangerous. Also, don’t purchase any professional-grade products to use at home. You’ll know a product isn’t meant for home use, because it won’t have colorful packaging or safety labeling meant for consumers and may instead look generic or be sold in a brown paper bag.
  2. Don’t let kids touch or light fireworks. While some fireworks–like sparklers–may seem harmless, they can cause serious injury. In fact, sparklers burn at 2,000 degrees which is equal to a blow torch and is hot enough to melt some metals.
  3. Plan ahead. Before you light any fireworks at home, make sure to have a bucket of water or garden hose ready. Always light fireworks one at a time and never try to get close or relight a firework that fails to go off.
  4. Be smart! Never throw fireworks or point them toward another person. Also don’t shoot fireworks in metal or glass containers.
  5. Prevent fires. After a firework is finished, douse the spent device with plenty of water from a bucket or hose before discarding it to prevent a trash or grass fire.

If you get burned by fireworks, you may also need the professionals to treat your injuries. Second-degree burns are characterized by blisters, swollen skin, and significant pain, according to Dr. Greg Hadden, medical director at Five Star ER-Dripping Springs. Run the injured area under cool water (not ice water) to relieve pain and reduce heat, then apply antibiotic ointment and loosely bandage with clean gauze. More serious second- and third-degree burns require an ER evaluation and may even warrant referral to a specialist.

Enjoying fireworks and relaxing in the great outdoors are part of summer fun. But if things end up a little less than fun, we’re here to help. We’ll get you in and out and feeling better fast, because your emergency matters to us! Find the Five Star ER location nearest you

– – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

About Five Star ER

Five Star ER is locally owned and operated by the physicians of Emergency Service Partners, a respected provider of emergency physician services to hospitals and health systems across Texas for nearly 30 years. Our experienced physicians bring their excellent tradition of emergency care to a first-class, patient-centered freestanding ER.

Our patient-centered care means you will come first. Our freestanding ER provides the capabilities of a hospital emergency department, without the hassles and long waits that can be part of a hospital ER. From the comfortable lounge area and private exam rooms to our top-notch medical team and latest technology, patients can be door-to-doctor in less than 15 minutes. Find the location nearest you.

This content was created to be purely educational in nature. This post is not meant to be used as a substitute for medical treatment or personal consultation regarding a medical condition. As always, if you or a loved one is suffering a life-threatening medical emergency or injury, call 911.

Connect with Five Star ER on Facebook, Instagram and Google+ for more information and health tips!

Share on FacebookShare on Google+Pin on PinterestTweet about this on TwitterShare on TumblrPrint this page

Don’t Let Grilling Injuries Ruin Your Summer Cookout

By | Health Basics, Lifestyle | No Comments

Grill Safety 101Fire? Check. Food? Check. Alcohol? Check. What could possibly go wrong when grilling outdoors? As it turns out, a whole lot! According to the Consumer Product Safety Commission, nearly 18,000 people are sent to the ER each year because of grilling-related accidents. Summer is in full swing in Central Texas, and there’s no better time than now to freshen up on grilling safety! Take a look at our Grill Safety 101 survival guide that will help you and your family have a safe barbecuing season!

 

Safety Tip #1

Keep anything (or anyone) that can be burned away from the grill. Never leave a lit grill unattended, especially if children or pets are around. Clothing like shirt tails, sleeves or apron strings can also easily catch fire so be sure to wear appropriate clothes and to make sure they don’t come into contact with open flames. Finally, never try to move a lit or hot grill. And remember, the grill will stay hot for at least an hour after use.

Safety Tip #2

Use long-handled utensils such as spatulas, tongs, forks and brushes designed specifically for grilling to avoid getting too close to the flames.

Safety Tip #3

Don’t leave perishables out for more than one hour to prevent bacteria from growing. The temperature “danger zone” is between 70° F and 130° F, where it is estimated that harmful bacteria can rapidly multiply as often as every 10 minutes. It’s scary to think about, but each year more than 400,000 people suffer from foodborne illness after eating contaminated food.

Safety Tip #4

Keep cooked meats away from raw meats. Using the same platter or utensils that previously held raw meat, poultry, or seafood allows bacteria from the raw food’s juices to spread to the cooked food. Instead, have a clean platter and utensils ready at grill-side to serve your food.

Safety Tip #5

Always use a thermometer to ensure food is cooked to the minimum internal temperature to destroy harmful bacteria.

 

Grilling and relaxing in the great outdoors is part of summer fun. But if things end up a little less than fun, we’re here to help. We’ll get you in and out and feeling better fast, because your emergency matters to us! Click to find the Five Star ER nearest you: http://fivestarer.com/locations

 

– – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

About Five Star ER

Five Star ER is locally owned and operated by the physicians of Emergency Service Partners, a respected provider of emergency physician services to hospitals and health systems across Texas for nearly 30 years. Our experienced physicians bring their excellent tradition of emergency care to a first-class, patient-centered freestanding ER.

Our patient-centered care means you will come first. Our freestanding ER provides the capabilities of a hospital emergency department, without the hassles and long waits that can be part of a hospital ER. From the comfortable lounge area and private exam rooms to our top-notch medical team and latest technology, patients can be door-to-doctor in less than 15 minutes. Find the location nearest you.

This content was created to be purely educational in nature. This post is not meant to be used as a substitute for medical treatment or personal consultation regarding a medical condition. As always, if you or a loved one is suffering a life-threatening medical emergency or injury, call 911.

Connect with Five Star ER on Facebook, Instagram and Google+ for more information and health tips!

Share on FacebookShare on Google+Pin on PinterestTweet about this on TwitterShare on TumblrPrint this page

Be Prepared to Beat the Heat This Summer!

By | Health Basics | No Comments

We all know how hot Texas summers can get. Preventing heat exhaustion allows everyone to enjoy the summer months without risking heat stress or heat stroke. Do you know what signs and symptoms to watch out for? Keep reading to find out!

Signs and Symptoms of Heat Exhaustion

Heat exhaustion occurs when the body gets too hot. Normally, your body will cool itself by sweating, but if you are not adequately hydrated the body systems that regulate temperature will become overwhelmed and become too hot.

Prevention is easy and essential.

“You have to stay hydrated,” says Dr. Brian Aldred, medical director of Five Star ER in Round Rock, TX. “Cover up your skin with loose-fitting clothing as much as possible, stay out of the direct heat as much as possible, obviously sun screen and hats and visors are helpful to protect your skin, and just drink lots of fluids.”

Many people think that heat exhaustion only occurs at high temperatures, but that’s not the case. In fact, heat exhaustion can occur when outside temperatures are as low as 57 degrees Fahrenheit.

Signs and symptoms of heat exhaustion include:

  • Sweating
  • Fatigue
  • Headache
  • Pale, clammy skin
  • Thirst
  • Rapid heartbeat
  • Dizziness, fainting
  • Nausea, vomiting
  • Muscle and abdominal cramps
  • Mild temperature elevations
  • Weakness

It is important to stay hydrated with water, coconut water, or another beverage (without caffeine) that replenishes necessary minerals and nutrients that are lost through sweat. Heat stroke can come on rapidly, but if you stay cool and hydrated it can be easily be prevented.

What Do I Do if I See Someone Suffering from Heat Exhaustion?

Heat exhaustion requires immediate attention because it can progress to heatstroke, a life-threatening illness.

“Heatstroke is characterized by the body being overwhelmed with its response to try to cool itself,” Aldred says. “Typically, with heat exhaustion, you’re very sweaty. With heatstroke, you actually become dried up. Your body cannot sweat anymore; it doesn’t have the fluids and mechanisms to cool itself down. This is a significant medical emergency characterized by confusion, sometimes seizure, and even just unresponsiveness.”

If you suspect heatstroke, call 911 immediately. While help is on the way, take the following steps to help cool the person down:

  • Put the person in a cool tub of water or a cool shower.
  • Get the person wet with a garden hose.
  • Sponge with cool water.
  • Fan while misting with cool water.
  • Place ice packs or cool wet towels on the neck, armpits and groin.
  • Cover with cool damp sheets.
  • Let the person drink cool water or other nonalcoholic beverage without caffeine, if he or she is able.
  • Begin CPR if the person loses consciousness and shows no signs of circulation, such as breathing, coughing or movement.

– – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

About Five Star ER

Five Star ER is locally owned and operated by the physicians of Emergency Service Partners, a respected provider of emergency physician services to hospitals and health systems across Texas for nearly 30 years. Our experienced physicians bring their excellent tradition of emergency care to a first-class, patient-centered freestanding ER.

Our patient-centered care means you will come first. Our freestanding ER provides the capabilities of a hospital emergency department, without the hassles and long waits that can be part of a hospital ER. From the comfortable lounge area and private exam rooms to our top-notch medical team and latest technology, patients can be door-to-doctor in less than 15 minutes. To find the location nearest you, click here.

This content was created to be purely educational in nature. This post is not meant to be used as a substitute for medical treatment or personal consultation regarding a medical condition. As always, if you or a loved one is suffering a life-threatening medical emergency or injury, call 911.

Connect with Five Star ER on Facebook, Instagram and Google+ for more information and health tips!

Today we are talking about heat and dehydration

Posted by Five Star ER on Wednesday, August 3, 2016

 

Share on FacebookShare on Google+Pin on PinterestTweet about this on TwitterShare on TumblrPrint this page

Breathe Easier: Know the Signs of an Asthma Attack

By | Health Basics | No Comments

We are streaming live from our Dripping Springs location today with Five Star ER Dr. Janna Welch! Today’s #WellnessWednesday topic is allergies and asthma. Have questions? Leave them in the comments!

Posted by Five Star ER on Wednesday, January 11, 2017

Asthma is a chronic disease that affects more than 24 million Americans, including 6 million children. Each year, Asthma attacks and complications account for 2 million emergency room visits. Knowing the symptoms of an asthma emergency, and when to seek asthma emergency treatment, could save your life or the life of someone you love.

What Is Asthma?

Asthma is defined as a lung disease that inflames and narrows the airways making it hard to breathe. Asthma sufferers have frequent episodes of wheezing (a whistling sound when you breathe), chest tightness, shortness of breath, and coughing.

“Asthma is a potentially very serious lung disease that, unfortunately, is really, really common,” says Dr. Janna Welch, an emergency medicine physician at Five Star ER in Dripping Springs, TX. “Basically, it’s inflammatory changes in your lung in the small tubes that come down into your lung for oxygen exchange, called bronchioles. In those bronchioles, because of irritants and allergens in the atmosphere, you get swelling of those tubes, so it’s much harder for air to flow through. Also, there’s a spasm component, called bronchospasm, where irritants get into those airways that are already constricted from swelling, and make them clamp down really tight. That’s when you hear wheezing.”

Who Suffers from Asthma?

Asthma is a condition that affects people of all ages. In most cases the first symptoms of asthma manifest during childhood, and continue on as the person ages. In the United States, an estimated 24 million people suffer from asthma.

How Do You Know if You Suffer from Asthma?

Asthma can be difficult to diagnose because often the symptoms come and go. If you are consistently experiencing symptoms like the ones listed above (wheezing, tightness of the chest, coughing) you may be suffering from asthma. If you suspect you may be suffering from asthma, your doctor will evaluate your medical history as well as your family’s. After some lung function tests, your doctor may choose to prescribe medication if they feel you are indeed suffering from asthma.

Is Asthma Hereditary?

“Experts think so,” Welch says. “They think there are two components: a genetic component—they haven’t quite figured out what that is, but asthma certainly runs in families—and then there’s a big environmental component—how much dust is in the area where you live, how much pet dander and how many outdoor allergens you are exposed to.”

What is an “Asthma Attack”?

“Any irritants can cause an asthma attack,” Welch says. Asthma attacks range from mild to severe, and require different levels of care depending on their level of severity. During a mild asthma attack, you may experience wheezing, coughing, and be short of breath. Often times, an inhaler kept on hand can prevent mild asthma attacks from becoming severe.

More severe asthma attacks may require medical attention, as they can become life-threatening. Severe asthma attacks are characterized by an inability to breathe caused by narrowed pathways that become clogged with mucus.

In rare cases, asthma can be fatal. “One of my childhood friends actually died from an asthma attack,” Welch says. “What happens with these patients is, their asthma gets really bad, they take all of their treatments, they are not responding to their treatments very well, and they just simply get tired and their body has less and less ability to compensate for the difficulty breathing. As they get tired, they eventually lose consciousness and stop breathing. It happens in very rare cases, but it’s something that you need to know about.”

What Should I Do if Someone is Having an Asthma Attack?

If you or some else is having an asthma attack it is important not to panic. Panicking can exacerbate some of the more dangerous symptoms of the attack. Call 911 or get emergency help right away if you or someone else is experiencing any of the following symptoms:

  • Feeling out of breath, even when you’re not moving
  • Trouble walking, talking, or doing normal activities
  • Anxiety
  • Not feeling better after using your rescue inhaler
  • Peak flow readings of less than 50% of your personal best
  • Bluish lips and fingernails
  • Exhaustion or confusion
  • The skin around your ribs looking “sucked in” (especially in children)
  • Unconsciousness

 

About Five Star ER

Five Star ER is locally owned and operated by the physicians of Emergency Service Partners, L.P., a respected provider of emergency physician services to hospitals and health systems across Texas for more than 28 years. Our experienced physicians bring their excellent tradition of emergency care to a first-class, patient-centered freestanding ER.

Our patient-centered care means you will come first. Our freestanding ER provides the capabilities of a hospital emergency department, without the hassles and long waits that can be part of a hospital ER. From the comfortable lounge area and private exam rooms to our top-notch medical team and latest technology, patients can be door-to-doctor in less than 15 minutes. To find the location nearest you, click here.

This content was created to be purely educational in nature. This post is not meant to be used as a substitute for medical treatment or personal consultation regarding a medical condition. As always, if you or a loved one is suffering a life-threatening medical emergency or injury, call 911.

Connect with Five Star ER on Facebook, Instagram and Google+ for more information and health tips!

Share on FacebookShare on Google+Pin on PinterestTweet about this on TwitterShare on TumblrPrint this page

When Is a Food Allergy a Medical Emergency?

By | Health Basics | No Comments

Food Allergy Action Month

May Is Food Allergy Action Month!

Food allergies are a serious medical condition affecting an estimated 15 million people in the United States. A food allergy sends someone to the ER every three minutes! Read on to learn more about food allergies and what to do in an emergency.

What Is a Food Allergy?

Food allergy is an immune system reaction that occurs soon after eating a certain food. Even a tiny amount of the allergy-causing food can trigger signs and symptoms such as digestive problems, hives or swollen airways. Most food allergies first develop in children 6 years old or younger, but food allergies can appear in adults as well.

While any food can trigger a reaction, eight specific foods make up about 90% of all allergic reactions:

  1. Milk
  2. Eggs
  3. Peanuts
  4. Tree nuts (like walnuts and pecans)
  5. Soy
  6. Wheat
  7. Fish
  8. Shellfish

What Are the Symptoms of a Food Allergy?

An allergic reaction can happen within minutes of eating, or it may happen hours later. Food allergy symptoms can range from mild to severe. Just because an initial reaction causes few problems doesn’t mean that all reactions will be similar; a food that triggered only mild symptoms on one occasion may cause more severe symptoms at another time.

“Many people think they only have a food intolerance to certain foods,” says Dr. Brian Aldred, medical director of Five Star ER in Round Rock, TX. “If you experience mild abdominal pain, bloating, or nausea after eating, it is most likely a case of food intolerance. If you develop a rash, itching of the skin/tongue/throat, or any sensation of tongue or throat swelling, you likely are having a food allergy. Mild food allergies may become more severe, and even life-threatening, with a subsequent exposure to the food.”

Mild symptoms of a food allergy include:

Severe symptoms of a food allergy include:

Mild to moderate symptoms (e.g., itching, sneezing, hives or rashes) are often treated with antihistamines and oral or topical steroids. Severe food allergy reactions should be treated as an emergency and medical help should be sought immediately.

“Simple rashes can often be treated with topical benadryl or oral benadryl,” says Dr. Mike Zimmerman, medical director of Five Star ER in Pflugerville, TX.

When Is a Food Allergy a Medical Emergency?

Severe symptoms of a food allergy alone or in combination with mild symptoms may be signs of anaphylaxis, a potentially life-threatening allergic reaction. During an anaphylactic reaction, the body releases chemical substances, including histamine, into the blood stream which causes blood vessels in multiple parts of the body to swell. Within minutes of an anaphylactic reaction, a person’s airways could become so restricted that they are unable to breathe.

“If you are having any swelling of the mouth, lips, tongue, throat, or any feeling like you can’t breathe, you need to go to the ER ASAP,” Zimmerman says.

Anaphylaxis requires immediate medical treatment, including a prompt injection of epinephrine and a trip to a hospital emergency room. If it isn’t treated properly, anaphylaxis can be fatal.

– – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

About Five Star ER

Five Star ER is locally owned and operated by the physicians of Emergency Service Partners, L.P., a respected provider of emergency physician services to hospitals and health systems across Texas for nearly 30. Our experienced physicians bring their excellent tradition of emergency care to a first-class, patient-centered freestanding ER.

Our patient-centered care means you will come first. Our freestanding ER provides the capabilities of a hospital emergency department, without the hassles and long waits that can be part of a hospital ER. From the comfortable lounge area and private exam rooms, to our top-notch medical team and latest technology, patients can be door-to-doctor in less than 15 minutes. To find the location nearest you, click here.

This content was created to be purely educational in nature. This post is not meant to be used as a substitute for medical treatment or personal consultation regarding a medical condition. As always, if you or a loved one is suffering a life-threatening medical emergency or injury, call 911.

 

Share on FacebookShare on Google+Pin on PinterestTweet about this on TwitterShare on TumblrPrint this page

The Truth About Bats & Rabies

By | Environment, Health Basics | No Comments

On Wednesday, April 19, Five Star ER Medical Director Dr. Brian Aldred sat down with Dianne Odegard, Education & Outreach Manager at Bat Conservation International, to discuss rabies and bats. This topic has been in the news lately with bats testing positive for rabies at various locations in the Austin area.

Medical Director Dr. Brian Aldred is live for #WellnessWednesday on the topic of bats and rabies with special guest Dianne Odegard of Bat Conservation International.

Posted by Five Star ER on Wednesday, April 19, 2017

Statistics from Texas Health and Human Services show that about 95% of the animals that tested positive for rabies are bats. But that information can be somewhat misleading. More bats are tested than any other animal, and it is important to remember that a very small percentage of bats are actually “carriers” of rabies. This means that the vast majority of bats who have rabies have contracted the virus and will die from it. Rabies is a serious virus that certainly can be fatal in humans, however, annually only about 1 – 2 people die from rabies in the United States.

Prevention is Key

If you encounter a wild animal that could have rabies, such as a bat, raccoon, fox, skunk or coyote, keep a safe distance. Never attempt to catch or kill such an animal. Call 311 if you have an animal in your home and need help removing it.

What to Do if You are Bit

Rabies is transmitted through the saliva of an infected animal, usually with a bite. If you think you have been bit, or have come into contact with the saliva of an animal that could have rabies, seek medical attention immediately.

Why Bats are Important

Odegard tells us in the video about the different varieties of bats and their function in our ecosystem. According to Bat Conservation International, 78 bat species are endangered worldwide. Bats pollinate more than 500 species of plants, spread seeds in deforested regions, and eat insects; in fact, little brown bats have been observed eating more than 600 mosquitoes in an hour.

Bats are not naturally aggressive. Since we live in a city with a large bat population, it is important to be educated on how to coexist with bats in a safe way.

To learn more, watch the video, and visit www.batcon.org.

Download this notice for what to do if you find a bat in your school:
English  |  Español

Share on FacebookShare on Google+Pin on PinterestTweet about this on TwitterShare on TumblrPrint this page

Know the Signs of Alcohol Poisoning

By | Health Basics, Lifestyle | No Comments

Spring break is that time of year when college students head out with friends to take a break from studies. SXSW and other spring break activities are fun, but you should be aware of the dangers of binge drinking.

Five Star ER Medical Director, Dr. Greg Hadden says “Visits to the ER for alcohol intoxication have surged in the last decade. Being irresponsible with alcohol consumption can lead to a costly ER bill, severe injury to the intoxicated person, and sometimes even death. Each year thousands of young healthy people die from just consuming alcohol irresponsibly. Even more die from the poor decisions that they make while intoxicated such as driving, boating, etc.”

What is Alcohol Poisoning?

Alcohol poisoning is defined as having a very high level of alcohol in the body which can shut down critical areas of the brain that control breathing, heart rate, body temperature and more. Without medical help, a person suffering from alcohol poisoning can die. Consuming large amounts of alcohol in a short period of time is referred to as binge drinking and is the most common cause of alcohol poisoning.

What Are The Signs of Alcohol Poisoning?

Common signs and symptoms of alcohol poisoning include confusion, vomiting, seizures, slow or irregular breathing and low body temperature. However, it’s not necessary to have all the symptoms before you seek medical help. If you suspect that someone has alcohol poisoning, seek immediate medical care. A person with alcohol poisoning who is unconscious or can’t be awakened is at risk of dying.

Who Is At Risk For Alcohol Poisoning?

While any adult who consumes a large amount of alcohol in a short period of time is at risk for alcohol poisoning, college students are more likely to binge drink.
According to one study, during spring break the average college aged male reported drinking 18 drinks per day and the average college aged female reported up to 10 drinks per day – an amount well above the safe levels of alcohol consumption. Researchers estimate that around 50% of college students will drink until they pass out at least one time during spring break. 1,825 college students between the ages of 18 and 24 die each school year from alcohol-related unintentional injuries.

How Do You Prevent Alcohol Poisoning?

Nobody wants to eliminate the fun of spring break, but you should always make safety a priority. Here are a few tips:

1. Stay hydrated
2. Avoid having several drinks during a short period of time
3. Know your own alcohol limits
4. Don’t drink and drive
5. Seek emergency medical help if you suspect alcohol poisoning
About Five Star ER

Five Star ER is locally owned and operated by the physicians of Emergency Service Partners, L.P., a respected provider of emergency physician services to hospitals and health systems across Texas for more than 28 years. Our experienced physicians bring their excellent tradition of emergency care to a first-class, patient-centered freestanding ER.

Our patient-centered care means you will come first. Our freestanding ER provides the capabilities of a hospital emergency department, without the hassles and long waits that can be part of a hospital ER. From the comfortable lounge area and private exam rooms to our top-notch medical team and latest technology, patients can be door-to-doctor in less than 15 minutes. To find the location nearest you, click here.

This content was created to be purely educational in nature. This post is not meant to be used as a substitute for medical treatment or personal consultation regarding a medical condition. As always, if you or a loved one is suffering a life-threatening medical emergency or injury, call 911.

Share on FacebookShare on Google+Pin on PinterestTweet about this on TwitterShare on TumblrPrint this page

5 Tips For Staying Safe During Spring Break

By | Health Basics | No Comments

Whether your idea of spring break fun is relaxing at the neighborhood pool or going on a family trip to the beach, these tips can keep you and your family safe!

1. Limit Alcohol

Spring break is a time to relax and unwind, but don’t overdo it! According to the CDC, alcohol-related motor vehicle crashes kill someone every 31 minutes and nonfatally injure someone every two minutes. Plan for a sober ride home or use a designated driver to prevent alcohol related accidents and injuries.

2. Have Fun In The Sun But Don’t Get Burned!

Using sunscreen does more than just prevent sunburns, it helps prevent skin cancer caused by the sun’s harmful ultraviolet rays. The American Academy of Dermatology recommends applying sunscreen at least 15 minutes prior to going outside and to make sure you are using a sunscreen that is water resistant, offers broad spectrum protection and has a sun protection factor (SPF) of 30 or higher.

If you do end up getting a sunburn, use these tips from Five Star ER Medical Director Dr. Brian Aldred on how to treat it!

3. Seek Shade

The sun’s rays are the strongest between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m., so if you are headed outdoors during that time make sure to seek shade, and rest often to avoid overheating. Wearing a wide-brimmed hat and sunglasses is also a good idea!

4. Swim Safely

Swimming is an easy way to beat the central Texas heat, but always make sure you and your children are swimming safely! One in five people who die from drowning are 14 years old or younger. To avoid drowning accidents, children should never swim alone and should always be wearing proper swim equipment like life jackets and flotation devices.

5. Stay Hydrated

Whether you are exercising outside, at the pool, or relaxing in the sun you can easily become dehydrated if you don’t drink enough fluids. Thirst is often the most common symptom of dehydration, but there are additional warning signs to watch out for including dry mouth, fatigue, flushed skin, and a headache. Watch this short video to learn ways to stay hydrated.

About Five Star ER
Five Star ER is locally owned and operated by the physicians of Emergency Service Partners, L.P., a respected provider of emergency physician services to hospitals and health systems across Texas for more than 28 years. Our experienced physicians bring their excellent tradition of emergency care to a first-class, patient-centered freestanding ER.

Our patient-centered care means you will come first. Our freestanding ER provides the capabilities of a hospital emergency department, without the hassles and long waits that can be part of a hospital ER. From the comfortable lounge area and private exam rooms to our top-notch medical team and latest technology, patients can be door-to-doctor in less than 15 minutes. To find the location nearest you, click here.

This content was created to be purely educational in nature. This post is not meant to be used as a substitute for medical treatment or personal consultation regarding a medical condition. As always, if you or a loved one is suffering a life-threatening medical emergency or injury, call 911.

Share on FacebookShare on Google+Pin on PinterestTweet about this on TwitterShare on TumblrPrint this page

Top 5 Reasons To Learn CPR

By | Health Basics | No Comments

Top 5 Reasons To Learn CPR

Did you know nearly 88% of cardiac arrests occur at home? That means if called on to administer CPR in an emergency, the life you save is likely to be someone at home: a child, a spouse, a parent or a friend. CPR is easy to learn and an important skill to have – you could end up saving someone’s life!

Here are five great reasons to learn CPR and get certified today!

1. CPR Saves Lives

More than 420,000 people suffer from cardiac arrest in the U.S. each year. Cardiac arrest occurs when the heart stops and is no longer delivering blood to the rest of the body. For every minute without defibrillation, a sudden cardiac arrest victim’s chance of surviving drops. It is critical for as many people as possible to be trained to perform CPR.

2. Anyone Can Perform CPR

National statistics have shown that only 15 to 30 percent of people who experience sudden cardiac arrests outside of hospitals receive bystander CPR. When people are asked why they would not give CPR, a very common answer is that they never received training. Learning how to perform CPR can be done in as little as a few minutes!

3. Mouth-to- Mouth Resuscitation Is Not Required

It’s not surprising that another reason people do not perform CPR is because they believe mouth-to-mouth resuscitation is required. In 2010 the guidelines for performing CPR were changed, and the American Heart Association now says that if you do not feel comfortable, or have not received formal training, you should attempt hands-only CPR. Hands-only CPR has been shown to be just as effective for many adults who experience sudden cardiac arrest.

4. Most Cardiac Arrests Happen At Home

Nearly 88% of cardiac arrests happen at home which means if called on to administer CPR in an emergency, the life you save is likely to be someone at home: a child, a spouse, a parent or a friend.

5. Hands Only CPR is Easy to Learn!

Recently, Five Star ER Medical Director Dr. Mike Zimmerman participated in our #WellnessWednesday Facebook live segment to show how easy it is to learn CPR. If you didn’t catch the live stream, watch it now and learn how to perform CPR for adults and young children.

 

Share on FacebookShare on Google+Pin on PinterestTweet about this on TwitterShare on TumblrPrint this page

Is It The Flu Or Cedar Fever?

By | Health Basics | No Comments

Is It The Flu Or Cedar Fever?

If you’ve been sniffling, sneezing and coughing the past few weeks you’re not alone! Not only is it flu season, it’s also cedar season in Texas. Learn how to spot the signs of seasonal winter allergies and how to tell the difference between them and the flu.

Seasonal Flu Symptoms

While seasonal influenza (flu) viruses can be detected year-round in the United States, flu viruses are most common during the fall and winter. According to the CDC, flu infections tend to spike after the holiday season and can extend through March.

Medical Director Dr. Greg Hadden says, “We are in the middle of flu season and we are seeing a lot of people who are sick and suffering. The CDC just announced that this year’s flu season is turning out to be worse than last year’s. The good news is that this year’s vaccine is a good match for the dominant strains of flu that are circulating. The bad news is that currently only about 40% of Americans have gotten the flu shot this year; which may be why we are seeing so many flu patients turning up in the emergency room.”

Symptoms of the flu include fever, chills, muscle aches, cough, congestion, runny nose, headaches, and fatigue. Because the flu can often last for a week or longer, complications can arise as a result of the illness including pneumonia, bronchitis, asthma flare-ups and more.

When To Seek Emergency Care

While most people who get the flu can treat themselves at home, there are times when you should seek emergency medical care. If you or your child have any of the following symptoms or are at risk of complications get medical care immediately:

  • Coughing up blood or green-tinged mucus
  • Trouble breathing, shortness of breath, or rapid breathing
  • Pain or pressure in the chest
  • Confusion
  • Bluish-colored lips or nails
  • High fever
  • Convulsions from fever (this usually affects children)
  • Fever or cough that becomes severe or won’t go away

Cedar Fever Symptoms

Cedar is notorious for being one of Texas’ worst allergens but could be worse this year due to the amount of rain local areas received in 2016 which spurred cedar tree growth and more pollen. Typically, cedar season starts in mid-December and can last through March.

Symptoms of cedar fever or cedar allergies include runny nose, itchy and watery eyes, sneezing, congestion, headache and sore throat. Although it’s in the name, most people who experience cedar fever don’t actually run a fever but may feel “flushed” due to the allergic reaction.

When To Seek Emergency Care

While most people with cedar fever or cedar allergies can use over-the-counter antihistamines, eye drops and nasal sprays to reduce symptoms and ease comfort, if symptoms persist they may lead to a sinus infection and can worsen other health issues like asthma. If you or your child have any of the following symptoms or are at risk of complications, seek medical care immediately:

  • Trouble breathing, shortness of breath, or rapid breathing
  • Constriction of airways and a swollen tongue or throat
  • Pain or pressure in the chest
  • Confusion
  • Skin reactions including hives and itching

About Five Star ER

Five Star ER is locally owned and operated by the physicians of Emergency Service Partners, L.P., a respected provider of emergency physician services to hospitals and health systems across Texas for more than 28 years. Our experienced physicians bring their excellent tradition of emergency care to a first-class, patient-centered freestanding ER.

Our patient-centered care means you will come first. Our freestanding ER provides the capabilities of a hospital emergency department, without the hassles and long waits that can be part of a hospital ER. From the comfortable lounge area and private exam rooms to our top-notch medical team and latest technology, patients can be door-to-doctor in less than 15 minutes. To find the location nearest you, click here.

This content was created to be purely educational in nature. This post is not meant to be used as a substitute for medical treatment or personal consultation regarding a medical condition. As always, if you or a loved one is suffering a life-threatening medical emergency or injury, call 911.

Share on FacebookShare on Google+Pin on PinterestTweet about this on TwitterShare on TumblrPrint this page